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Lindsey Smith || Visual Literacy 2014


Musings of an American University freshman.

For this week’s client design exercise, I decided to create an advertisement for Iona’s Take Charge/Live Well Academy. From what Lylie Fisher told us during her presentation, it seems that she has the greatest need for products related to the Take Charge/Live Well Academy, as opposed to any other sect of Iona. Additionally, I decided to create an eight by ten standard advertisement that could either be placed in a magazine, or simply handed out as a flyer. I believe that this would satisfy the client’s need for advertising for this particular class.
 
In terms of the final project, I would potentially love to expand upon this visual prototype. While I may not recreate this exact ad, I could see myself creating other similar advertisements for the Take Charge/Live Well Academy, or even other areas of Iona, if need be. Another way in which I could potentially expand upon this is by taking my own pictures, instead of using images that I found online. In doing this, I would able to combine my love of photography with my love of design and marketing.  
 

Before showing it to the client, there are a few potential improvements I could make. First and foremost, as aforementioned, I would love to use my own photography, rather than images found on the web. In doing this, I believe the advertisement would become much more personal and less “cookie-cutter”. Also, somehow, I would like to include more information about what the class is actually about, without cluttering the page with potentially extraneous information.  

For this week’s client design exercise, I decided to create an advertisement for Iona’s Take Charge/Live Well Academy. From what Lylie Fisher told us during her presentation, it seems that she has the greatest need for products related to the Take Charge/Live Well Academy, as opposed to any other sect of Iona. Additionally, I decided to create an eight by ten standard advertisement that could either be placed in a magazine, or simply handed out as a flyer. I believe that this would satisfy the client’s need for advertising for this particular class.

 

In terms of the final project, I would potentially love to expand upon this visual prototype. While I may not recreate this exact ad, I could see myself creating other similar advertisements for the Take Charge/Live Well Academy, or even other areas of Iona, if need be. Another way in which I could potentially expand upon this is by taking my own pictures, instead of using images that I found online. In doing this, I would able to combine my love of photography with my love of design and marketing.  

 

Before showing it to the client, there are a few potential improvements I could make. First and foremost, as aforementioned, I would love to use my own photography, rather than images found on the web. In doing this, I believe the advertisement would become much more personal and less “cookie-cutter”. Also, somehow, I would like to include more information about what the class is actually about, without cluttering the page with potentially extraneous information.  

In my photo essay, I wanted to focus on one of the things that I admire the most: humanity. I am fascinated by how we as a species have evolved to become the way that we are today as a collective. Furthermore, I find the spectrum of emotions that we are able to show amazingly vast, and worthy of being captured. Over these past few weeks, I have taken numerous portraits that chronicle the range of human emotion. In this photo essay, I wanted to start with more calm pictures, move into photos that radiated happiness, and then finally end with more solemn images. In doing this, I wanted to show how dynamic our mental and emotional states are. Furthermore, I wanted to demonstrate how humans can show a variety of emotions, even in the same place, and at the same time. For example, at a gathering that my friends had last weekend, there were images where the subjects looked confused, some looked happy, and some looked sad. Although they were all taken at the same event within the range of a few hours, different emotions were captured depending on whom the subject was. In doing this assignment, I looked to Karen Miranda Rivadeneira and Rachelle Mozman, two artists who were showcased at the “Staging the Self” exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery. Both of these artists focused on portraiture, and the range of style and emotion that this particular art form can encompass.

The second I stepped into the Newseum, I knew what I wanted to talk about in this post. I was immediately struck by the sheer amount of attention that was given to the tragedies of 9/11: all the photography, artifacts and relics of that date preserved in there struck a very personal chord for me. From a strictly journalistic perspective, it made complete sense, as September 11th was one of the biggest news dates of the 21st century. However, to me, these photos meant so much more. As a native New Yorker, there has been no greater world event that has struck so close to home as 9/11. My dad was supposed to be in the towers that day, but was stuck in traffic. Even though nobody told me what was going on at the time, at only four years old, on my fifth day of kindergarten, I could sense the desperation and panic in the air. As soon as I saw this photograph, I knew that this was what I wanted to discuss.
Tom Franklin of The Record newspaper in Bergen County, NJ took this photo that fateful afternoon after the Al Qaeda plane crashes at the Twin Towers. The official names for the photograph used by The Record are “Firefighters Raising Flag” and “Firefighter Raising the Flag at Ground Zero”. It appeared on the front page of The Record that day, as well as on the Associated Press wire and the covers of several global newspapers. He noticed the three firemen climbing on top of the rubble to raise a flag at Ground Zero, and snapped a quick photo, not realizing what an iconic photo it would become.  In taking this photo, he saw a striking similarity between this composition and that of the Iwo Jima image of World War II. Eventually, this photo was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and later featured on a U.S postage stamp. Newspaper columnist Rob Dreher once said, “There are three kinds of people who run towards a disaster, not away: cops, firemen and reporters”. As we know to be true today, these three groups of people were some of the real heroes of the tragedy of 9/11.

In addition to this photograph being historically important, it is also visually appealing. It follows many of the fundamental elements of photography: for example, this is a great example of the rule of thirds. The heads of the two firemen flanking the central fireman are placed at the top left and top right apexes of the rule of thirds’ frame. In terms of angle of view, this photo was taken from underneath the firefighters with a telephoto lens approximately 150 yards away. This fact was largely influenced by the fact that the reporters and photographers could not get too close to the crash site, for their own safety. The background of this photo is also texturally interesting, as you can see all of the debris that the crashes left behind. I also thought the tone of this photograph was very interesting; the color scheme of the photograph is very drab, a fact largely influenced by the large amounts of dust that clouded the air. This lends itself to a very melancholy, cool tone. For me, there could not be a more fitting color scheme for the tragedies of that day.

The second I stepped into the Newseum, I knew what I wanted to talk about in this post. I was immediately struck by the sheer amount of attention that was given to the tragedies of 9/11: all the photography, artifacts and relics of that date preserved in there struck a very personal chord for me. From a strictly journalistic perspective, it made complete sense, as September 11th was one of the biggest news dates of the 21st century. However, to me, these photos meant so much more. As a native New Yorker, there has been no greater world event that has struck so close to home as 9/11. My dad was supposed to be in the towers that day, but was stuck in traffic. Even though nobody told me what was going on at the time, at only four years old, on my fifth day of kindergarten, I could sense the desperation and panic in the air. As soon as I saw this photograph, I knew that this was what I wanted to discuss.

Tom Franklin of The Record newspaper in Bergen County, NJ took this photo that fateful afternoon after the Al Qaeda plane crashes at the Twin Towers. The official names for the photograph used by The Record are “Firefighters Raising Flag” and “Firefighter Raising the Flag at Ground Zero”. It appeared on the front page of The Record that day, as well as on the Associated Press wire and the covers of several global newspapers. He noticed the three firemen climbing on top of the rubble to raise a flag at Ground Zero, and snapped a quick photo, not realizing what an iconic photo it would become.  In taking this photo, he saw a striking similarity between this composition and that of the Iwo Jima image of World War II. Eventually, this photo was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and later featured on a U.S postage stamp. Newspaper columnist Rob Dreher once said, “There are three kinds of people who run towards a disaster, not away: cops, firemen and reporters”. As we know to be true today, these three groups of people were some of the real heroes of the tragedy of 9/11.

In addition to this photograph being historically important, it is also visually appealing. It follows many of the fundamental elements of photography: for example, this is a great example of the rule of thirds. The heads of the two firemen flanking the central fireman are placed at the top left and top right apexes of the rule of thirds’ frame. In terms of angle of view, this photo was taken from underneath the firefighters with a telephoto lens approximately 150 yards away. This fact was largely influenced by the fact that the reporters and photographers could not get too close to the crash site, for their own safety. The background of this photo is also texturally interesting, as you can see all of the debris that the crashes left behind. I also thought the tone of this photograph was very interesting; the color scheme of the photograph is very drab, a fact largely influenced by the large amounts of dust that clouded the air. This lends itself to a very melancholy, cool tone. For me, there could not be a more fitting color scheme for the tragedies of that day.

Scavenger Hunt (3/3)

Scavenger Hunt (2/3)

Scavenger Hunt (1/3)

Photo Essay Project

Upon reviewing various options for this project, it became clear to me that what I wanted to photograph most was simply people. I am fascinated by human nature, and why we do certain things and act in certain ways… and what better way is there to capture the human experience than with photography. Portraiture is a unique sext of photography, as it focuses mainly on the human subject of the photo, instead of what surrounds it. I took these this past weekend at the Lambda Chi Watermelon Smash, where various teams of individuals competed in various games to raise money for Rape Culture awareness. In preparation for this project, I focused solely on the human aspect of the event. I took photos of various people at the event, both during the various competitions and afterwards. They explore a wide range of human emotion, movement, and structure. 

Photo Essay (2/2)

Photo Essay (1/2)

Here are the updated versions of my resume and business card! I changed a lot of the fonts and some of the formatting.